Policies & Code of Conduct


Cambridge Cycling Club / Crüe 2022

Definitions

The following terms have these meanings in this Code

Individuals”– Individuals employed by, or engaged in activities with, the Organization including, but not limited to, athletes, coaches, convenors, referees, officials, volunteers, managers, administrators, committee members, parents or guardians, and Directors and Officers of the Organization

Workplace – Any place where business or work-related activities are conducted. Workplaces include but are not limited to, the Organization’s office, work-related social functions, work assignments outside the Organization’s offices, work-related travel, and work-related conferences or training sessions

Purpose

  1. The purpose of this Code is to ensure a safe and positive environment by making Individuals aware that there is an expectation, at all times, of appropriate behaviour consistent with the Organization’s core values. The Organization supports equal opportunity, prohibits discriminatory practices, and is committed to providing an environment in which all individuals are treated with respect and fairness.

Application of this Code

  1. This Code applies to Individuals’ conduct during the Organization’s business, activities, and events including, but not limited to, races, training, competitions, practices, tryouts, training camps, travel associated with the Organization’s activities, the Organization’s office

Environment, and any meetings.

  1. An individual who violates this Code may be subject to sanctions pursuant to the Organization’s DisciplineandComplaintsPolicy. In addition to facing possible sanction pursuant to the Organization’s DisciplineandComplaintsPolicy,an Individual who violates this Code during a competition may be ejected from the competition or the playing area, the official may delay the competition until the Individual complies with the ejection, and the Individual may be subject to any additional discipline associated with the particular competition.
  2. An employee of the Organization found to have engaged in acts of violence or harassment against any other employee, worker, contractor, member, customer, supplier, client or another third party during business hours, or at any Organization event, will be subject to appropriate disciplinary action subject to the terms of the Organization’s policies for human resources well as the employee’s Employment Agreement (if applicable).
  3. This Code also applies to Individuals’ conduct outside of the Organization’s business, activities, and events when such conduct adversely affects relationships within the Organization (and its work and sports environment) and is detrimental to the image and reputation of the Organization. Such applicability will be determined by the Organization at its sole discretion.

Responsibilities

Members have a responsibility to:

  1. Maintain and enhance the dignity and self-esteem of the Organization members and other individuals by:
    1. Demonstrating respect to individuals regardless of body type, physical characteristics, athletic ability, age, ancestry, colour, race, citizenship, ethnic origin, place of origin, creed, disability, family status, marital status, gender identity, gender expression, sex, and sexual orientation
      1. Focusing  comments  or  criticism  appropriately  and  avoiding  public  criticism  of  athletes,  coaches,  officials, organizers, volunteers, employees, or members
      2. Consistently demonstrating the spirit of sportsmanship, sports leadership, and ethical conduct
      3. Acting, when appropriate, to correct or prevent practices that are unjustly discriminatory
      4. Consistently treating individuals fairly and reasonably
      5. Ensuring adherence to the rules of the sport and the spirit of those rules
    2. Refrain from any behaviour that constitutes harassment, where harassment is defined as comment or conduct directed towards an individual or group, which is offensive, abusive, racist, sexist, degrading, or malicious. Types of behaviour that constitute harassment include, but are not limited to:
      1. Written or verbal abuse, threats, or outbursts
      2. Persistent unwelcome remarks, jokes, comments, innuendo, or taunts
      3. Leering or other suggestive or obscene gestures
      4. Condescending or patronizing behaviour which is intended to undermine self-esteem, diminish performance or adversely affect working conditions
      5. Practical jokes which endanger a person’s safety, or negatively affect performance

that are part of the normal work function, including measures to correct performance deficiencies, such as placing someone on a performance improvement plan or imposing discipline for workplace infractions. Types of behaviour that constitute workplace harassment include, but are not limited to:

  1. Bullying
  2. Repeated offensive or intimidating phone calls or emails
  3. Inappropriate sexual touching, advances, suggestions or requests
  4. Displaying or circulating offensive pictures, photographs or materials in printed or electronic form
  5. Psychological abuse
  6. Personal harassment
  7. Discrimination
  8. Intimidating words or conduct (offensive jokes or innuendos)
  9. Words or actions which are known or should reasonably be known to be offensive, embarrassing, humiliating, or demeaning
  10. Refrain from any behaviour that constitutes workplace violence, where workplace violence is defined as the exercise of physical force by a person against a worker, in a workplace, that causes or could cause physical injury to the worker; an attempt to exercise physical force against a worker, in a workplace, that could cause physical injury to the worker; or a

statement or behaviour that it is reasonable for a worker to interpret as a threat to exercise physical force against the worker, in a workplace, that could cause physical injury to the worker. Types of behaviour that constitute workplace harassment include, but are not limited to:

  1. Verbal threats to attack a worker
  2. Sending to or leaving threatening notes or emails for a worker
  3. Making threatening physical gestures to a worker
  4. Wielding a weapon in a workplace
  5. Hitting, pinching or unwanted touching of a worker which is not accidental
  6. Throwing an object at a worker
  7. Blocking normal movement or physical interference of a worker, with or without the use of equipment
  8. Sexual violence against a worker
  9. Any attempt to engage in the type of conduct outlined above
  10. Refrain from any behaviour that constitutes sexual harassment, where sexual harassment is defined as unwelcome sexual comments and sexual advances, requests for sexual favours, or conduct of a sexual nature. Types of behaviour that constitute

sexual harassment includes, but is not limited to:

  1. Sexist jokes
  2. Display of sexually offensive material
  3. Sexually degrading words used to describe a person
  4. Inquiries or comments about a person’s sex life
  5. Unwelcome sexual flirtations, advances, or propositions
  6. Persistent unwanted contact
  7. Abstain from the non-medical use of drugs or the use of performance-enhancing drugs or methods. More specifically, the Organization adopts and adheres to the Canadian Anti-Doping Program. Any infraction under this Program shall be considered an infraction of this Code and may be subject to further disciplinary action, and possible sanction, pursuant to the Organization’s DisciplineandComplaintsPolicy. the Organization will respect any penalty enacted pursuant to a breach of the Canadian Anti-Doping Program, whether imposed by the Organization or any other sport organization
  8. Refrain from associating with any person for the purpose of coaching, training, competition, instruction, administration, management, athletic development, or supervision of the sport, who has incurred an anti-doping rule violation and is serving

a sanction involving a period of ineligibility imposed pursuant to the Canadian Anti-Doping Program and/or the World Anti- Doping Code and recognized by the Canadian Centre for Ethics in Sport (CCES)

  1. Refrain from the use of power or authority in an attempt to coerce another person to engage in inappropriate activities
  2. Refrain  from  consuming  tobacco  products,  or  recreational  drugs  while  participating  in  the  Organization’s  programs, activities, competitions, or events
  3. In the case of adults, avoid consuming alcohol in competitions and situations where minors are present and take reasonable steps  to  manage  the  responsible  consumption  of  alcohol  in  adult-oriented  social  situations  associated  with  the

Organization’s events

  1. Respect the property of others and not wilfully cause damage
  2. Promote the sport in the most constructive and positive manner possible
  3. When driving a vehicle with an Individual:
    1. Not have his or her license suspended;
    2. Not be under the influence of alcohol or illegal drugs or substances; and
    3. Have valid car insurance
  4. Adhere to all federal, provincial, municipal and host country laws
  5. Refrain from engaging in deliberate cheating which is intended to manipulate the outcome of a competition and/or not offer or receive any bribe which is intended to manipulate the outcome of a competition
  6. Comply, at all times, with the Organization’s bylaws, policies, procedures, and rules and regulations, as adopted and amended from time to time

Directors, Committee Members, and Staff

  1. In addition to section 7 (above), the Organization’s Directors, Committee Members, and Staff will have additional responsibilities to:
    1. Function primarily as a Director or Committee Member of the Organization; not as a member of any other particular member or constituency
    2. Act with honesty and integrity and conduct themselves in a manner consistent with the nature and responsibilities of the Organization’s business and the maintenance of Individuals’ confidence
    3. Ensure that the Organization’s financial affairs are conducted in a responsible and transparent manner with due regard for all fiduciary responsibilities
    4. Conduct themselves openly, professionally, lawfully and in good faith in the best interests of the Organization
    5. Be independent and impartial and not be influenced by self-interest, outside pressure, expectation of reward, or fear of criticism
    6. Behave with decorum appropriate to both circumstance and position
    7. Keep informed about the Organization’s activities, the local sport community, and general trends in the sectors in which they operate
    8. Exercise the degree of care, diligence, and skill required in the performance of their duties pursuant to the laws under which the Organization is incorporated
    9. Respect the confidentiality appropriate to issues of a sensitive nature
    10. Respect the decisions of the majority and resign if unable to do so
    11. Commit the time to attend meetings and be diligent in preparation for, and participation in, discussions at such meetings
    12. Have a thorough knowledge and understanding of all the Organization governance documents
    13. Conform to the bylaws and policies approved by the Organization

Coaches

  1. In addition to section 7 (above), coaches have many additional responsibilities. The coach-athlete relationship is a privileged one and plays a critical role in the personal, sport, and athletic development of the athlete. Coaches must understand and respect the inherent

power imbalance that exists in this relationship and must be extremely careful not to abuse it, consciously or unconsciously. Coaches will:

  1. Ensure a safe environment by selecting activities and establishing controls that are suitable for the age, experience, ability, and fitness level of the involved athletes
  2. Prepare athletes systematically and progressively, using appropriate time frames and monitoring physical and psychological

adjustments while refraining from using training methods or techniques that may harm athletes

  1. Avoid compromising the present and future health of athletes by communicating and cooperating with sport medicine professionals in the diagnosis, treatment, and management of athletes’ medical and psychological treatments
  2. Support the coaching staff of a training camp, provincial team, or national team; should an athlete qualify for participation with one of these programs
  3. Accept and promote athletes’ personal goals and refer athletes to other coaches and sports specialists as appropriate
  4. Provide athletes (and the parents/guardians of minor athletes) with the information necessary to be involved in the decisions that affect the athlete
  5. Act in the best interest of the athlete’s development as a whole person
  6. Comply with the Organization’s Screening Policy, if applicable
  1. Report to the Organization any ongoing criminal investigation, conviction, or existing bail conditions, including those for violence, child pornography, or possession, use, or sale of any illegal substance
  2. Under no circumstances provide, promote, or condone the use of drugs (other than properly prescribed medications) or

performance-enhancing substances and, in the case of minors, alcohol and/or tobacco

  1. Respect athletes playing with other teams and, in dealings with them, not encroach upon topics or actions which are deemed to be within the realm of ‘coaching’, unless after first receiving approval from the coaches who are responsible for the athletes
  2. Not engage in a sexual relationship with an athlete under 18 years old, or an intimate or sexual relationship with an athlete

over the age of 18 if the coach is in a position of power, trust, or authority over the athlete

  1. Recognize the power inherent in the position of coach and respect and promote the rights of all participants in sport. This is accomplished by establishing and following procedures for confidentiality (right to privacy), informed participation, and fair and reasonable treatment. Coaches have a special responsibility to respect and promote the rights of participants who are

in a vulnerable or dependent position and less able to protect their own rights

  1. Dress professionally, neatly, and inoffensively
  2. Use inoffensive language, taking into account the audience being addressed

Athletes

  1. In addition to section 7 (above), athletes will have additional responsibilities to:
    1. Report any medical problems in a timely fashion, when such problems may limit their ability to travel, practice, or compete; or in the case of carded athletes, interfere with the athlete’s ability to fulfill requirements under the Athlete Assistance

Program

  1. Participate and appear on-time and prepared to participate to their best abilities in all competitions, practices, training sessions, tryouts, tournaments, and events
  2. Properly represent themselves and not attempt to participate in a competition for which they are not eligible by reason of

age, classification, or other reason

  1. Adhere to the Organization’s rules and requirements regarding clothing and equipment
  2. Act in a sportsmanlike manner and not display appearances of violence, foul language, or gestures to other athletes, officials, coaches, or spectators
  3. Dress to represent the sport and themselves well and with professionalism
  4. Act in accordance with the Organization’s policies and procedures and, when applicable, additional rules as outlined by coaches or managers

Officials

  1. In addition to section 7 (above), officials will have additional responsibilities to:
    1. Maintain and update their knowledge of the rules and rules changes
    2. Work within the boundaries of their position’s description while supporting the work of other officials
    3. Act as an ambassador of the Organization by agreeing to enforce and abide by national and provincial rules and regulations
    4. Take ownership of actions and decisions made while officiating
    5. Respect the rights, dignity, and worth of all individuals
    6. Not publicly criticize other officials or any club or association
    7. Act openly, impartially, professionally, lawfully, and in good faith
    8. Be fair, equitable, considerate, independent, honest, and impartial in all dealings with others
    9. Respect the confidentiality required by issues of a sensitive nature, which may include ejections, defaults, forfeits, discipline processes, appeals, and specific information or data about Individuals
    10. Honour all assignments unless unable to do so by virtue of illness or personal emergency, and in these cases inform the

assignor or association at the earliest possible time

  1. When writing reports, set out the true facts
  2. Dress in proper attire for officiating

Parents/Guardians and Spectators

  1. In addition to section 7 (above), parents/guardians and spectators at events will:
    1. Encourage athletes to compete within the rules and to resolve conflicts without resorting to hostility or violence
    2. Condemn the use of violence in any form
    3. Never ridicule a participant for making a mistake during a performance or practice
    4. Provide positive comments that motivate and encourage participants’ continued effort
    5. Respect the decisions and judgments of officials, and encourage athletes to do the same
    6. Never question an official’s or staff member’s judgment or honesty
    7. Support all efforts to remove verbal and physical abuse, coercion, intimidation, and sarcasm
    8. Respect and show appreciation to all competitors, and to the coaches, officials and other volunteers
    9. Not harass competitors, coaches, officials, parents/guardians, or other spectators

Discipline and Complaints Policy

“Organization” refers to:  Cambridge Cycling Club / Crüe 2022

Definitions

  1. The following terms have these meanings in this Policy:
    1. Complainant” – The Party alleging an infraction
    2. Days” – Days including weekends and holidays
    3. DisciplineChair(s)” – An individual or individuals appointed by the Board to be the first point-of-contact for all discipline and complaint matters reported to the Organization
    4. Individuals”– All categories of membership defined in the Organization’s Bylaws, as well as all individuals employed by, or engaged in activities with, the Organization including, but not limited to, athletes, coaches, convenors, officials, umpires, volunteers, managers, administrators, committee members, Directors and Officers of the Organization, spectators, and parents/guardians of athletes
    5. Respondent” – The alleged infracting Party

Purpose

  1. Individuals are expected to fulfill certain responsibilities and obligations including, but not limited to, complying with the Organization’s policies, Bylaws, rules and regulations, and CodeofConductandEthics. Non-compliance may result in sanctions pursuant to this

Policy.

Discipline Chair

  1. The Discipline Chair will be a Director of the Board, or an individual appointed by the Board to handle the duties of the Discipline Chair. The Board may choose to appoint three (3) individuals to serve as Discipline Chairs and, in this case, decisions of the

Discipline Chairs will be by majority vote.

  1. The Discipline Chair(s) appointed to handle a complaint or incident must be unbiased and not in a conflict of interest situation.

Application of this Policy

  1. This Policy applies to all Individuals.
  1. This Policy applies to matters that may arise during the course of the Organization’s business, activities, and events including, but not limited to, competitions, practices, tryouts, training camps, travel associated with Organization activities, and any meetings.
  1. This Policy also applies to Individuals’ conduct outside of the Organization’s business, activities, and events when such conduct adversely affects relationships within the Organization (and its work and sport environment), is detrimental to the image and reputation of the Organization, or upon the acceptance of the Organization. Applicability will be determined by the Organization at its sole discretion.
  1. This Policy does not prevent immediate discipline or sanction from being applied as reasonably required. Further discipline may be applied according to this Policy. Any infractions or complaints occurring within competition will be dealt with by the procedures specific to the competition, if applicable. In such situations, disciplinary sanctions will be for the duration of the competition, training, activity, or event only.
  1. An employee of the Organization who is a Respondent will be subject to appropriate disciplinary action per the Organization’s policies for human resources as well as the employee’s Employment Agreement, if applicable. Violations may result in a warning, reprimand, restrictions, suspension, or other disciplinary actions up to and including termination of employment.

Process

  1. Any Individual may report an incident or complaint to the Discipline Chair in writing, within fourteen (14) days of the alleged incident, although this timeline can be waived or extended at the Discipline Chair’s discretion. At the Organization’s discretion, the Organization

may act as the Complainant and initiate the complaint process under the terms of this Policy. In such cases, the Organization will identify an individual to represent the Organization.

  1. Upon receipt of a complaint, the Discipline Chair has discretion to choose which process should be followed, and may use the following examples as a general guideline:
  1. Process #1 – the Complaint alleges the following incidents:
    1. Disrespectful, abusive, racist, or sexist comments or behaviour
  1. Disrespectful conduct
  2. Minor incidents of violence (e.g., tripping, pushing, elbowing)
  3. Conduct contrary to the values of the Organization
  4. Non-compliance with the Organization’s policies, procedures, rules, or regulations

vi.   Minor violations of the Organization’s Code of Conduct and Ethics

  1. Process #2 – the Complaint alleges the following incidents:
    1. Repeated minor incidents
    2. Any incident of hazing
    3. Behaviour that constitutes harassment, sexual harassment, or sexual misconduct
    4. Major incidents of violence (e.g., fighting, attacking, sucker punching)
    5. Pranks, jokes, or other activities that endanger the safety of others
    6. Conduct that intentionally interferes with a competition or with any athlete’s preparation for a competition
    7. Conduct that intentionally damages the Organization’s image, credibility, or reputation
    8. Consistent disregard for the Organization’s bylaws, policies, rules, and regulations
    9. Major or repeated violations of the Organization’s Code of Conduct and Ethics
    10. Intentionally damaging Organization property or improperly handling the Organization monies
    11. Abusive use of alcohol, any use or possession of alcohol by minors, or use or possession of illicit drugs and narcotics
    12. A conviction for any Criminal Code offense
    13. Any possession or use of banned performance enhancing drugs or methods

Process #1: Handled by Discipline Chair

Sanctions

  1. Following the determination that the complaint or incident should be handled under Process #1, the Discipline Chair will review the submissions related to the complaint or incident and determine one or more of the following sanctions:
    1. Verbal or written reprimand
    2. Verbal or written apology
    3. Service or other contribution to the Organization
    4. Removal of certain privileges
    5. Suspension from certain teams, events, and/or activities
    6. Suspension from all Organization activities for a designated period of time
    7. Any other sanction considered appropriate for the offense
  1. The Discipline Chair will inform the Respondent of the sanction, which will take effect immediately.
  1. Records of all sanctions will be maintained by the Organization.

Request for Reconsideration

  1. The sanction may not be appealed until the completion of a request for reconsideration. However, the Respondent may contest the sanction  by  submitting  a  Request  for  Reconsideration  within  two  (2)  days  of  receiving  the  sanction.  In  the  Request  for

Reconsideration, the Respondent must indicate:

  1. Why the sanction is inappropriate;
  2. All evidence to support the Respondent’s position; and
  3. What penalty or sanction (if any) would be appropriate
  1. Upon receiving a Request for Reconsideration, the Discipline Chair may decide to accept or reject the Respondent’s suggestion for an appropriate sanction.
  1. Should the Discipline Chair accept the Respondent’s suggestion for an appropriate sanction, that sanction will take effect immediately.
  1. Should the Discipline Chair not accept the Respondent’s suggestion for an appropriate sanction, the initial complaint or incident will be handled under Process #2 of this Policy.

Process #2: Handled by Case Manager

Case Manager

  1. Following the determination that the complaint or incident should be handled under Process #2, the Organization will appoint a Case Manager to oversee management and administration of the complaint or incident. Such appointment is not appealable.
  1. The Case Manager has a responsibility to:
  1. Determine whether the complaint is frivolous and/or within the jurisdiction of this Policy
  2. Appoint the Discipline Panel, if necessary
  3. Coordinate all administrative aspects and set timelines
  4. Provide administrative assistance and logistical support to the Discipline Panel as required
  5. Provide any other service or support that may be necessary to ensure a fair and timely proceeding

Procedures

  1. If the Case Manager determines the complaint is:
    1. Frivolous or outside the jurisdiction of this Policy, the complaint will be dismissed immediately
    2. Not frivolous and within the jurisdiction of this Policy, the Case Manager will notify the Parties that the complaint is accepted and of the applicable next steps
  1. The Case Manager’s decision to accept or dismiss the complaint may not be appealed.
  1. The Case Manager will establish and adhere to timelines that ensure procedural fairness and that the matter is heard in a timely fashion.
  1. After notifying the Parties that the complaint has been accepted, the Case Manager will appoint a Discipline Panel, which shall consist of a single Adjudicator, to hear the complaint. In extraordinary circumstances, and at the discretion of the Case Manager, a Discipline Panel of three persons may be appointed to hear the complaint. In this event, the Case Manager will appoint one of the Discipline Panel’s members to serve as the Chair.
  1. The Case Manager, in cooperation with the Discipline Panel, will then decide the format under which the complaint will be heard. This decision may not be appealed. The format of the hearing may be an oral in-person hearing, an oral hearing by telephone or other communication medium, a hearing based on a review of documentary evidence submitted in advance of the hearing, or a combination of these methods. The hearing will be governed by the procedures that the Case Manager and the Discipline Panel deem appropriate in the circumstances, provided that:
    1. The Parties will be given appropriate notice of the day, time, and place of the hearing, in the case of an oral in-person hearing or an oral hearing by telephone or other communication medium
    2. Copies of any written documents which the parties wish to have the Discipline Panel consider will be provided to all Parties, through the Case Manager, in advance of the hearing
    3. The Parties may engage a representative, advisor, or legal counsel at their own expense
    4. The Discipline Panel may request that any other individual participate and give evidence at the hearing
    5. The Discipline Panel may allow as evidence at the hearing any oral evidence and document or thing relevant to the subject matter of the complaint, but may exclude such evidence that is unduly repetitious, and shall place such weight on the evidence as it deems appropriate
  1. The decision will be by a majority vote of the Discipline Panel
  1. If the Respondent acknowledges the facts of the incident, the Respondent may waive the hearing, in which case the Discipline Panel will determine the appropriate sanction. The Discipline Panel may still hold a hearing for the purpose of determining an appropriate sanction.
  1. The hearing will proceed in any event, even if a Party chooses not to participate in the hearing.
  1. If a decision may affect another party to the extent that the other party would have recourse to a complaint or an appeal in their own right, that party will become a Party to the current complaint and will be bound by the decision.
  1. In fulfilling its duties, the Discipline Panel may obtain independent advice.

Decision

  1. After hearing and/or reviewing the matter, the Discipline Panel will determine whether an infraction has occurred and, if so, the sanctions to be imposed. Within fourteen (14) days of the hearing’s conclusion, the Discipline Panel’s written decision, with reasons,

will be distributed to all Parties, the Case Manager, and the Organization. In extraordinary circumstances, the Discipline Panel may first issue a verbal or summary decision soon after the hearing’s conclusion, with the full written decision to be issued before the end of the fourteen (14) day period. The decision will be considered a matter of public record unless decided otherwise by the Discipline Panel.

Sanctions

  1. The Discipline Panel may apply the following disciplinary sanctions, singularly or in combination:

a) Verbal or written reprimand Verbal or written apology Service or other contribution to the Organization Removal of certain privileges Suspension from certain teams, events, and/or activities Suspension from all Organization activities for a designated period of time Payment of the cost of repairs for property damage Suspension of funding from the Organization or from other sources Expulsion from the Organization Any other sanction considered appropriate for the offense

  1. Unless the Discipline Panel decides otherwise, any disciplinary sanctions will begin immediately, notwithstanding an appeal. Failure to comply with a sanction as determined by the Discipline Panel will result in an automatic suspension until such time as compliance occurs.
  1. Records of all decisions will be maintained by the Organization.

Appeals

  1. The decision of the Discipline Panel may be appealed in accordance with the Ontario Cycling Association’s Appeal Policy.

Suspension Pending a Hearing

  1. The Organization may determine that an alleged incident is of such seriousness as to warrant suspension of an Individual pending completion of a criminal process, the hearing, or a decision of the Discipline Panel.

Criminal Convictions

  1. An Individual’s conviction for a CriminalCodeoffense, as determined by the Organization, will be deemed an infraction under this Policy and will result in expulsion from the Organization. Criminal Code offences may include, but are not limited to:
    1. Any child pornography offences
    2. Any sexual offences
    3. Any offence of physical violence
    4. Any offence of assault
    5. Any offence involving trafficking of illegal drugs

Confidentiality

  1. The discipline and complaints process is confidential and involves only the Parties, the Case Manager, the Discipline Panel, and any independent advisors to the Discipline Panel. Once initiated and until a decision is released, none of the Parties will disclose

confidential information relating to the discipline or complaint to any person not involved in the proceedings.

Timelines

  1. If the circumstances of the complaint are such that adhering to the timelines outlined by this Policy will not allow a timely resolution to the complaint, the Discipline Panel may direct that these timelines be revised.

Records and Distribution of Decisions

  1. Other individuals or organizations, including but not limited to, national sport organizations, provincial sport organizations, sport clubs, etc., may be advised of any decisions rendered in accordance with this Policy.

Concussion Policy and Concussion Code of Conduct (Ontario)

Preamble

  1. This Policy is based on the 5th Consensus Statement on Concussion in Sport that was released in April 2017. This Policy interprets the information contained in the report that was prepared by the 2017 Concussion in Sport Group (CISG), a group of sport concussion medical practitioners and experts, and adapts concussion assessment and management tools.
  1. This Policy is intended to be compliant with Ontario’s Rowan’s Law (Concussion Safety), 2018. If any provision of the policy is in conflict with Rowan’s Law, the legislation shall take precedence.
  1. The CISG suggested 11 ‘R’s of Sport-Related Concussion (“SRC”) management to provide a logical flow of concussion management. This Policy is similarly arranged. The 11 R’s in this Policy are: Recognize, Remove, Re-Evaluate, Rest, Rehabilitation, Refer, Recover, Return to Sport, Reconsider, Residual Effects, and Risk Reduction.
  1. A concussion is a clinical diagnosis that can only be made by a physician.

Definitions

  1. The following terms have these meanings in this Policy:
  1. Organization” – [Cambridge Cycling Club / Crüe 2022]
  2. Participant” – Coaches, athletes, volunteers, officials and other Registered Individuals
  3. Registered Individuals” – All individuals employed by, or engaged in activities with the Organization, including but not limited to, employees, volunteers, administrators, committee members and directors and officers. 
  4. “Suspected Concussion” – means the recognition that an individual appears to have either experienced an injury or impact that may result in a concussion or who is exhibiting unusual behaviour that may be the result of concussion.
  5. “Sport-Related Concussion (“SRC”) – A sport-related concussion is a traumatic brain injury induced by biomechanical forces. Several common features that may be used to define the nature of a SRC may include:
  1. Caused either by a direct blow to the head, face, neck or elsewhere on the body with an impulsive force transmitted to the head.
  2. Typically results in the rapid onset of short-lived impairment of neurological function that resolves spontaneously. However, in some cases, signs and symptoms evolve over a number of minutes to hours.
  3. May result in neuropathological changes, but the acute clinical signs and symptoms largely reflect a functional disturbance rather than a structural injury and, as such, no abnormality may be visibly apparent
  4. Results in a range of clinical signs and symptoms that may or may not involve loss of consciousness. Resolution of the clinical and cognitive features typically follows a sequential course. However, in some cases symptoms may be prolonged.

Purpose

  1. The Organization is committed to ensuring the safety of Participants in its activities. The Organization recognizes the increased awareness of concussions and their long-term effects and believes that prevention of concussions is paramount to protecting the health and safety of Participants.

7. This Policy describes the common signs and symptoms of a concussion and how to identify them, the protocol to be followed in the event of a possible concussion, and a Return to Sport protocol should a concussion be diagnosed. Awareness of the signs and symptoms of concussion and knowledge of how to properly manage a concussion is critical to recovery and helping to ensure the individual is not returning to physical activities too soon, risking further complication.

  1. This Policy applies to all activities and events for which the Organization is the governing or sanctioning body including, but not limited to, competitions, practices, and training sessions.

Registration

  1. When an individual under the age of 26 years old registers with the Organization, the individual must provide written or electronic confirmation that they have reviewed concussion awareness resources within the past 12 months. The Ontario Government has produced age-appropriate concussion resources located here:
  1. Ages 10 and under
  2. Ages 11-14
  3. Ages 15+
  1. Individuals under the age of 26 years old must also sign the Concussion Code of Conduct (Appendix A).
  1. For athletes younger than 18 years old, the athlete’s parent or guardian must also provide confirmation that they have also reviewed the concussion resources as well and signed the Concussion Code of Conduct.
  1. Coaches, officials and team trainers must provide confirmation that they have also reviewed the concussion resources and sign the Concussion Code of Conduct; but not if they will be interacting exclusively with athletes who are 26 years old or older.

Recognizing Concussions

  1. If a Participant demonstrates or reports any of the following red flags, an on-site licensed healthcare professional shall be summoned and, if deemed necessary, an ambulance should be called:
  1. Neck pain or tenderness
  2. Double vision
  3. Weakness or tingling / burning in arms or legs
  4. Severe or increasing headache
  5. Seizure or convulsion
  6. Loss of consciousness 
  7. Deteriorating conscious state
  8. Vomiting more than once
  9. Increasingly restless, agitated, or combative
  10. Increased confusion
  1. The following observable signs may indicate a possible concussion:
  1. Lying motionless on the playing surface
  2. Slow to get up after a direct or indirect hit to the head
  3. Disorientation or confusion / inability to respond appropriately to questions
  4. Blank or vacant look
  5. Balance or gait difficulties, absence of regular motor coordination, stumbling, slow laboured movements
  6. Facial injury after head trauma

15. A concussion may result in the following symptoms:

  1. Headache or “pressure in head”
  2. Balance problems or dizziness
  3. Nausea or vomiting
  4. Drowsiness, fatigue, or low energy
  5. Blurred vision
  6. Sensitivity to light or noise
  7. More emotional or irritable
  8. “Don’t feel right”
  9. Sadness, nervousness, or anxiousness
  10. Neck pain
  11. Difficulty remembering or concentrating
  12. Feeling slowed down or “in a fog”
  1. Failure to correctly answer any of these memory questions may suggest a concussion:
  1. What venue are we at today?
  2. Where was your last major competition?
  3. What day is it?
  4. What event are you participating in?

Removal from Sport Protocol

  1. In the event of a Suspected Concussion where there are observable signs of a concussion, symptoms of a concussion, or a failure to correctly answer memory questions, the Participant should be immediately removed from participation by a designated person who is either an on-site Organization staff member and/or [ Designated Ride Leader Cambridge Cycling Club / Crüe 2022] .
  1. After removal from participation, the following actions should be taken:
  1. The designated person who removed the Participant should consider calling 9-1-1;
  2. The Organization must make and keep a record of the removal;
  3. The designated person must inform the Participant’s parent or guardian if the Participant is younger than 18 years old, and the designated person must inform the parent or guardian that the Participant is required to undergo a medical assessment by a physician or nurse practitioner before the Participant will be permitted to return to participation; and
  4. The designated person will remind the Participant, and the Participant’s parent or guardian as applicable, of the Organization’s Return-to-Sport protocol as described in this Policy.
  1. Participants who have a Suspected Concussion and who are removed from participation should:
  1. Be isolated in a dark room or area and stimulus should be reduced
  2. Be monitored
  3. Have any cognitive, emotional, or physical changes documented
  4. Not be left alone (at least for the first 1-2 hours)
  5. Not drink alcohol
  6. Not use recreational/prescription drugs
  7. Not be sent home by themselves
  8. Not drive a motor vehicle until cleared to do so by a medical professional
  1. A Participant who has been removed from participation due to a suspected concussion should not return to participation until the Participant has been assessed medically, preferably by a physician who is familiar with the Sport Concussion Assessment Tool – 5th Edition (SCAT5) (for Participants over the age of 12) or the Child SCAT5 (for Participants between 5 and 12 years old), even if the symptoms of the concussion resolve.

Re-Evaluate

  1. A Participant with a Suspected Concussion should be evaluated by a licensed physician who should conduct a comprehensive neurological assessment of the Participant and determine the Participant’s clinical status and the potential need for neuroimaging scans.

Rest and Rehabilitation

  1. Participants with a diagnosed SRC should rest during the acute phase (24-48 hours) but can gradually and progressively become more active so long as activity does not worsen the Participant’s symptoms. Participants should avoid vigorous exertion.
  1. Participants must consider the diverse symptoms and problems that are associated with SRCs. Rehabilitation programs that involve controlled parameters below the threshold of peak performance should be considered.

Refer

  1. Participants who display persistent post-concussion symptoms (i.e., symptoms beyond the expected timeline for recovery – 10-14 days for adults and 4 weeks for children) should be referred to physicians with experience handling SRCs.

Recovery and Return to Sport

  1. SRCs have large adverse effects on cognitive functioning and balance during the first 24-72 hours after injury. For most Participants, these cognitive defects, balance and symptoms improve rapidly during the first two weeks after injury. An important predictor of slower recovery from an SRC is the severity of the Participant’s initial symptoms following the first few days after the injury.
  1. The table below represents a graduated return to sport for most Participants, in particular those that did not experience high severity of initial symptoms after the following the first few days after the injury.
StageAimActivityStage Goal
1Daily activities at home that do not give the child symptomsTypical activities of the child during the day as long as they do not increase symptoms (e.g., reading, texting, screen time). Start with 5–15 min at a time and gradually build upGradual return to typical activities
2School activitiesHomework, reading or other cognitive activities outside of the classroomIncrease tolerance to cognitive work
3Return to school part-timeGradual introduction of schoolwork. May need to start with a partial school day or with increased breaks during the dayIncrease academic activities
4Return to school full timeGradually progress school activities until a full day can be toleratedReturn to full academic activities and catch up on missed work

Table 1 – Return to Sport Strategy

Residual Effects

  1. Participants should be alert for potential long-term problems such as cognitive impairment and depression. The potential for developing chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) should also be a consideration, although the CISG stated that “a cause-and-effect relationship has not yet been demonstrated between CTE and SRCs or exposure to contact sports. As such, the notion that repeated concussion or subconcussive impacts cause CTE remains unknown.”

Risk Reduction and Prevention

  1. The Organization recognizes that knowing a Participant’s SRC history can aid in the development of concussion management and the Return to Sport strategy. The clinical history should also include information about all previous head, face, or cervical spine injuries. The Organization encourages Participants to make coaches and other stakeholders aware of their individual histories.
  1. An initial period of 24-48 hours of both physical rest and cognitive rest is recommended before beginning the Return to Sport strategy.
  1. There should be at least 24 hours (or longer) for each step. If symptoms reoccur or worsen, the Participant should go back to the previous step.
  1. Resistance training should only be added in the later stages (Stage 3 or Stage 4).
  1. If symptoms persist, the Participant should return to see a physician.
  1. The Participant’s Return-to-Sport strategy should be guided and approved by a physician with regular consultations throughout the process.
  1. The Participant must provide the Organization with a medical clearance form, signed by a physician, following Stage 5 and before proceeding to Stage 6.

Reconsider 

  1. The 2017 Concussion in Sport Group (CISG) considered whether certain populations (children, adolescents, and elite athletes) should have SRCs managed differently.
  1. It was determined that all Participants, regardless of competition level, should be managed using the same SRC management principles.
  1. Adolescents (13 to 18 years old) and children (5 to 12 years old) should be managed differently. SRC symptoms in children persist for up to four weeks. More research was recommended for how these groups should be managed differently, but the CISG recommended that children and adolescents should first follow a Return to School strategy before they take part in a Return to Sport strategy.
    A Return to School strategy is described below.
StageAimActivityStage Goal
1Daily activities at home that do not give the child symptomsTypical activities of the child during the day as long as they do not increase symptoms (e.g., reading, texting, screen time). Start with 5–15 min at a time and gradually build upGradual return to typical activities
2School activitiesHomework, reading or other cognitive activities outside of the classroomIncrease tolerance to cognitive work
3Return to school part-timeGradual introduction of schoolwork. May need to start with a partial school day or with increased breaks during the dayIncrease academic activities
4Return to school full timeGradually progress school activities until a full day can be toleratedReturn to full academic activities and catch up on missed work

Table 1 – Return to Sport Strategy

Residual Effects

  1. Participants should be alert for potential long-term problems such as cognitive impairment and depression. The potential for developing chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) should also be a consideration, although the CISG stated that “a cause-and-effect relationship has not yet been demonstrated between CTE and SRCs or exposure to contact sports. As such, the notion that repeated concussion or subconcussive impacts cause CTE remains unknown.”

Risk Reduction and Prevention

  1. The Organization recognizes that knowing a Participant’s SRC history can aid in the development of concussion management and the Return to Sport strategy. The clinical history should also include information about all previous head, face, or cervical spine injuries. The Organization encourages Participants to make coaches and other stakeholders aware of their individual histories.